Still, we like that if you choose to re-up with FirstEnergy again at the end of your initial term, you won’t have to worry whether you’re enrolling at an expensive time of year. First, since it offers just two options, constant for years, its prices are set with the long haul in mind. Second, since the electricity grid in Pennsylvania is more taxed during winter than any other season (space heating accounts for 50 percent of household electricity consumption in PA; air conditioning just three percent), signing up in summer means prices won’t be temporarily inflated.
Corpus Christi energy consumers are located in the AEP Texas Central transmission and distribution service provider (TDSP) area. Residents and business owners within the AEP Texas Central area should immediately report an outage or service request to AEP. Typically, poles and wires damaged by severe storms take more time to repair. AEP Texas Central customers who want to receive updates on outages and estimated repair times can enroll in a text message or email alert program. For immediate electrical help, Corpus Christi residents and business owners should first call the following number.
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There are over 60 different energy suppliers competing for your business on any given day in Texas. Many of these electric companies have websites that are confusing and nearly impossible to navigate, their rates and fees hidden by dense industry jargon and misleading advertising. Who has the spare the time to sort through the choices spread out over all these different sites and companies?
To make reducing your usage and saving money on electricity even easier, we have an advanced online account dashboard available for all our residential electricity customers. You can go there anytime to pay your bill, check your usage, change your personal information and learn more about offers we have that apply specifically to you. All customers can sign up for our Weekly Summary Email, which helps you stay on top of your usage every week. Plus, many customers are eligible to sign up for Degrees of Difference, which gives you a bill credit when you reduce your usage during designated high-demand time periods. 
Dallas area residents now have the option for choosing their electric provider. However, with all of the different plans that are available, it can be difficult to make the right decision for your particular electricity needs. You may find yourself overwhelmed by the number of options presented to you by all the electric company advertisements or concerned about shady marketing gimmicks.

3.     Customer service:  When the only utility available has lousy customer service, nobody is surprised.  They don’t even pretend to care – they know they have you over a barrel.  With all these new players in town, however, it’s a slap in the face to be treated like royalty until you’ve signed on the dotted line and now they won’t even return your calls or the person on the phone can’t string three English words together or if he does speak English, he’s brand new and panicking trying to pull up your account information.


Keeping on top:  With deregulation, a whole host of electric resellers jumped into the market because there’s a whole lot of electricity to sell:  if Texas were a country, it’d be the 11th largest electricity consumer in the world!  Just by itself, it uses as much electricity as Spain or Great Britain!  That means there’s a whole lot of information you have to find, absorb, and process to make sure you’re getting the best rate for your needs.
The mid to late 1880s saw the introduction of alternating current (AC) systems in Europe and the U.S. AC power had an advantage in that transformers, installed at power stations, could be used to raise the voltage from the generators, and transformers at local substations could reduce voltage to supply loads. Increasing the voltage reduced the current in the transmission and distribution lines and hence the size of conductors and distribution losses. This made it more economical to distribute power over long distances. Generators (such as hydroelectric sites) could be located far from the loads. AC and DC competed for a while, during a period called the War of Currents. The DC system was able to claim slightly greater safety, but this difference was not great enough to overwhelm the enormous technical and economic advantages of alternating current which eventually won out.[1]
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