Before 1997, all energy services were provided by the utility with prices regulated by the Public Utility Commission to match the wholesale price of energy – subject to change as often as once a month. Following the law’s passage, however, prices became “deregulated”, meaning alternative suppliers could provide energy supply at different rates than the PUC-approved price of energy.
In order to provide complete functionality, this web site needs your explicit consent to store browser cookies. If you don't allow cookies, you may not be able to use certain features of the web site including but not limited to: log in, buy products, see personalized content, switch between site cultures. It is recommended that you allow all cookies.
Loudoun County does not provide curbside pick-up of either garbage or recycling.  However, there are many private contractors available.  Towns, community associations, and individuals often hire these contractors to provide such a service.  The county does maintain a public landfill and numerous recycle drop-off centers. The Waste Management Division of the Department of General Services provides detailed information on options and locations.
Whether you're looking for a long-term or short-term supply plan, an energy representative from ChooseTexasPower.org can assist you in your search. Call in to discuss the available supply plans in your area. From there, you can compare electricity providers and Corpus Christi electric rates. Also, you can enter your ZIP code to find supply plans in your community.
ElectricityPlans makes shopping for electricity plans simple and intuitive. We give you the search tools you need to narrow your electricity plan search to specific contract lengths. In addition, you can use advanced search to narrow the search for the perfect electricity plan even further by searching for 100% renewable, prepaid plans, or electricity + extra stuff, for example. We also show each plan’s popularity over the past 30 days so you know what other electricity shoppers have selected.

Whether you're looking for a long-term or short-term supply plan, an energy representative from ChooseTexasPower.org can assist you in your search. Call in to discuss the available supply plans in your area. From there, you can compare electricity providers and Corpus Christi electric rates. Also, you can enter your ZIP code to find supply plans in your community.
Here you'll find some of the most competitive retail energy plans available in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, listed by utility service area. These plans have been vetted by the team of experts at Choose Energy — an energy shopping and comparison website — and are recommended based on short-term value, long-term value, lowest price, percent green and plan popularity by utility service area.
*Only new customer successful enrollments with Constellation. Cards are issued by Virtual Rewards Center. Valid email address required for receipt of Gift card. Gift cards will not have cash access. For any questions about your Gift card, call our customer care team at 1-877-997-9995. The listed merchants are in no way affiliated with Constellation nor are the listed merchants to be considered sponsors or co-sponsors of this program. Use of merchant names and/or logos is by the permission of each respective merchant and all trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Terms and conditions are applied to gift cards/certificates. Please see the merchant gift card/gift certificate for additional terms and conditions, which are subject to change at merchant's sole discretion. Constellation will share your name and email address with Virtual Reward Center for reward fulfillment only. Reward link expires in 3 months.
Know that Green Mountain’s cheapest advertised plans are all variable rate plans. “Pollution Free,” “Pollution Free Try 3,” or “SolarSPARC 10 Try 3” all advertise a great initial rate — a full cent below Pennsylvania’s 8.49 cent “price to compare” — but its variable rates means the company can raise them at any time. The two “Try 3” plans just lock in the low introductory rate for three months instead of one. The flipside of fixed rate: Should prices fall, you’ll be locked into a contract with a constant, elevated rate for two more months.
Start with one of our three standard packages and add on equipment as you see fit. Basic packages start with door and window sensors, motion detectors and our touch-screen controller. The controller's signal cannot be cut, even if the panel is damaged, and its always-on cellular connection keeps the software up-to-date without you having to do a thing. From there, you can add on more security gear, including a doorbell camera you can monitor from your phone, a smart thermostat, smart lights you can program to turn on and off, a carbon monoxide detector or any number of features and locks to make your home as secure as you want it to be. 
In summary, fixed-rate plans provide a level of certainty and stability in your energy charge since the price will not fluctuate over the life of your contract. If prices suddenly spike, you are protected because your rate is locked in. The flip side is that if rates drop over the life of your contract, you’ll be stuck paying the higher rate. You can incur steep cancellation fees if you change electricity plans or providers before the end of your contract term.
Most of Direct Energy’s plans allow you to earn Plenti points — you get 1,000 as soon as you sign up. That initial windfall is about as good as it gets. You keep accumulating rewards with every payment, but just one point for every dollar you spend on supply charges (what you pay to Direct Energy vs. your EDC — so about two-thirds of your total bill). A Plenti point equates to about one cent, so that 1,000 point bonus works out to $10 when you cash it in with a Plenti merchant (Rite Aid, Macy’s, etc.) You’d have to spend a further $1,000 in supply charges before making off with another $10.00 in Plenti points.
The mid to late 1880s saw the introduction of alternating current (AC) systems in Europe and the U.S. AC power had an advantage in that transformers, installed at power stations, could be used to raise the voltage from the generators, and transformers at local substations could reduce voltage to supply loads. Increasing the voltage reduced the current in the transmission and distribution lines and hence the size of conductors and distribution losses. This made it more economical to distribute power over long distances. Generators (such as hydroelectric sites) could be located far from the loads. AC and DC competed for a while, during a period called the War of Currents. The DC system was able to claim slightly greater safety, but this difference was not great enough to overwhelm the enormous technical and economic advantages of alternating current which eventually won out.[1]
×