To make reducing your usage and saving money on electricity even easier, we have an advanced online account dashboard available for all our residential electricity customers. You can go there anytime to pay your bill, check your usage, change your personal information and learn more about offers we have that apply specifically to you. All customers can sign up for our Weekly Summary Email, which helps you stay on top of your usage every week. Interested in earning bill credits for reducing your usage? Eligible customers can sign up for Degrees of Difference, a program that gives you a bill credit for using less electricity than normal during designated high-demand time periods. You'll get countless benefits when you choose Reliant as your electricity provider.
Electric bills for customers in the Houston area can more than double in summer months, mainly because air conditioning. Not coincidentally, electric rates also rise in the summer months because of this increase in demand. The most dramatic rate increases occur in month-to-month plans, but electric rates do increase across the board for all fixed-rate contract lengths.

Please note: Your local wires company is still responsible for maintaining the wires and poles, delivery of the electricity, and responding to emergency outages. The only thing that changes is billing and customer service. Texas electricity companies will compete for your business by offering lower prices, added customer service benefits, or renewable energy options. By making a switch to a lower cost Texas energy provider, you can save hundreds of dollars.
REPs sell electricity rates to Houston energy consumers, but transmission and distribution service providers (TDSPs) deliver the supply of electricity. In Houston, CenterPoint Energy serves as the area's TDSP and works with about 85 REPs. If your power goes out, immediately report the issue to CenterPoint Energy, not your REP. Use the following phone numbers to get in touch with your Houston TDSP.
In Pennsylvania, you can choose your electricity and natural gas plan and supplier. More than 2.1 million households and over 250,000 businesses in the state already have made the switch. Now there's reason for more customers to explore electricity deregulation - two PA utilities have asked the state's Public Utilities Commission for permission to raise energy rates for transmitting power to homes and business.
In Laredo, it definitely gets hot, so it's important to find the best electricity plan for you to make sure your air conditioning is ready to run year-round. At Reliant, we're here to help, with electricity service you can count on and easy tools that put you in control of your electricity consumption. Call us or chat online or help on choosing the right plan for you.

Since you are located in a deregulated area of Texas and in the TXU Electric Delivery service area you do have a choice in your electricity provider. Katy residents and businesses can choose to stay with their Affiliate Retail Electric Provider (TXU Energy), or you can choose one of several competing Katy electricity providers: TXU Energy, Green Mountain Energy, Champion Energy Services, Commerce Energy, and StarTex Power. So make your choice today. Enter your ZIP code above to browse energy supply rates in your area.
Around 85% of Texas residents must choose an electricity provider. Utility companies transmit and distribute electricity to customers. But that electricity doesn’t come from a utility—it comes from companies known as Retail Electric Providers. These providers offer competitive plans based on electricity pricing, term length, renewable sourcing and more.
Another unwelcome side effect of not knowing your average monthly kWh usage level is that you may end up paying more than you expect. This can occur when a customer inadvertently shops an electric rate based on a higher usage level than they actually use. Electricity suppliers commonly advertise their electric rates associated with the highest (2000 kWh) usage levels since those tend to be the lowest rates.
It’s worth noting that you can switch for free with no exit fee 42-49 days before the end of your contract. Under Ofgem’s standards of conduct, energy firms have to give you between 42 and 49 days’ notice of your tariff ending. You can use this time to decide whether to stick with them, or switch. If you decide to switch, you won’t be charged an exit fee.

In deregulated states, electricity providers simply can't do business like that because consumers like you are demanding energy from renewable sources. Threats of global warming are too terrible to be irresponsible with our energy sources anymore. As a result, each electric company is pushing forward to find renewable energy sources that are cheaper, cleaner, and more reliable than older forms of energy.
How does that work? Spark Energy buys electricity and competes in the market for the best price -- a competition that ultimately drives prices down and allows us to deliver more value for your money. In Texas, switching to a different electricity provider is kind of like changing to a different long distance company. When you switch to Spark Energy, the utility will continue to deliver electricity to your home but Spark Energy will handle all the billing, including the utility’s delivery fees and the electricity you actually use.
Should you choose a short-term, long-term, month-to-month, or prepaid plan? The short answer: it depends on your specific needs. How long do you anticipate living at your location? Are you deciding in the peak season (summer in Houston) or off season? All electricity providers in Houston offer a broad selection of plans for different contract lengths. Many also offer month-to-month and prepaid electricity plans. The bottom line is that everyone’s needs are different and all contract term lengths offer advantages and disadvantages.
The mid to late 1880s saw the introduction of alternating current (AC) systems in Europe and the U.S. AC power had an advantage in that transformers, installed at power stations, could be used to raise the voltage from the generators, and transformers at local substations could reduce voltage to supply loads. Increasing the voltage reduced the current in the transmission and distribution lines and hence the size of conductors and distribution losses. This made it more economical to distribute power over long distances. Generators (such as hydroelectric sites) could be located far from the loads. AC and DC competed for a while, during a period called the War of Currents. The DC system was able to claim slightly greater safety, but this difference was not great enough to overwhelm the enormous technical and economic advantages of alternating current which eventually won out.[1]
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